Publication of Hogan & Maume, The Reminiscences of Ignatius O’Brien

Publication of Hogan & Maume, The Reminiscences of Ignatius O’Brien

The Irish Legal History Society is proud to announce the publication of our most recent volume,

The reminiscences of Ignatius O’Brien, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1913-18 A life in Cork, Dublin and Westminster

edited by Daire Hogan & Patrick Maume.

 

Ignatius O’Brien was the youngest son of a struggling Cork business family. After somewhat unhappy experiences at a Cork Vincentian school and the Catholic University of Ireland, he studied to become a barrister while supporting himself as a reporter on Dublin newspapers. Over time he built up a reputation in property and commercial law, and an ultimately successful career led to him being appointed a law officer and later lord chancellor under the post-1906 Liberal governments.

O’Brien avoided party politics, but was a moderate home ruler who attributed the troubles besetting relations between Britain and Ireland to a failure to implement moderate reforms in time. After being created Baron Shandon on his removal as lord chancellor, he moved to England, where as a member of the House of Lords he was involved in various peace initiatives.

His reminiscences of and reflections on the relatively self-contained world of mid-Victorian Cork, of student and journalistic work and play in Land War Dublin, of the struggles of an aspiring barrister on circuit and of the declining years of Dublin Castle, provide new insights into Irish life in the closing decades of the union. He also gives his impressions of prominent contemporaries, including Charles Stewart Parnell, Edward Carson and Lord Chief Justice Peter O’Brien (“Peter the Packer”).

The publication, part of the Irish Legal History Society series, of this important memoir is accompanied by detailed notes and commentaries on its legal and political context by Daire Hogan and Patrick Maume.

Daire Hogan is a solicitor and former president of the Irish Legal History Society. Patrick Maume is a researcher with the Royal Irish Academy’s Dictionary of Irish Biography, who has published extensively on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Irish history.

The Irish Legal Society is open to all those with an interest in legal history of Ireland – membership details can be found here.

All members receive a copy of each volume as it is published and are invited to partake in all ILHS events.

To date, the society has published thirty-one volumes. A full list of the publications of the society can be found here.

The reminiscences of Ignatius O’Brien, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1913-18

The reminiscences of Ignatius O’Brien, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1913-18

The reminiscences of Ignatius O’Brien, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1913-18

A life in Cork, Dublin and Westminster

Daire Hogan & Patrick Maume, editors

Ignatius O’Brien was the youngest son of a struggling Cork business family. After somewhat unhappy experiences at a Cork Vincentian school and the Catholic University of Ireland, he studied to become a barrister while supporting himself as a reporter on Dublin newspapers. Over time he built up a reputation in property and commercial law, and an ultimately successful career led to him being appointed a law officer and later lord chancellor under the post-1906 Liberal governments.

O’Brien avoided party politics, but was a moderate home ruler who attributed the troubles besetting relations between Britain and Ireland to a failure to implement moderate reforms in time. After being created Baron Shandon on his removal as lord chancellor, he moved to England, where as a member of the House of Lords he was involved in various peace initiatives.

His reminiscences of and reflections on the relatively self-contained world of mid-Victorian Cork, of student and journalistic work and play in Land War Dublin, of the struggles of an aspiring barrister on circuit and of the declining years of Dublin Castle, provide new insights into Irish life in the closing decades of the union. He also gives his impressions of prominent contemporaries, including Charles Stewart Parnell, Edward Carson and Lord Chief Justice Peter O’Brien (“Peter the Packer”).

The publication, part of the Irish Legal History Society series, of this important memoir is accompanied by detailed notes and commentaries on its legal and political context by Daire Hogan and Patrick Maume.

Daire Hogan is a solicitor and former president of the Irish Legal History Society.
Patrick Maume is a researcher with the Royal Irish Academy’s Dictionary of Irish Biography, who has published extensively on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Irish history.

ILHS Presidential Discourse – Prof Patrick Geoghegan

 

 

Professor Patrick Geoghegan will deliver his presidential discourse:

 

‘Investigating Jack the Ripper, Parnellism, and Other Crimes: Sir Robert Anderson and the Writing of History’

 

 

6 00 PM FRIDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2021 (please log on from 05.45PM)

 

Please join the zoom meeting, which is open to non-members, at
https://zoom.us/j/91081431731?pwd=d3REZzFGLzMvRFlRSWpGNlVrUjVkZz09

Meeting ID: 910 8143 1731                     Passcode: 261121

 

Announcement of a new Irish Legal History Society Student Essay Competition

STUDENT ESSAY COMPETITION

Undergraduates and postgraduates are invited to submit essays on any period of Irish legal history to compete for the inaugural Irish Legal History Society Student Essay Competition.

Founded in 1988, the Society examines, explores and engages with all issues relating to legal history on the island of Ireland, from earliest times to the present day, including the work of Irish lawyers abroad. Its mission is to encourage the study and advance the knowledge of the history of Irish law. To further this work and to recognise and reward the work of students during the ‘Decade of Centenaries’, the Society is holding a student essay competition for works in the field of Irish legal history broadly conceived.

Prize: The winning entrant will receive a prize of €250.

Eligibility: The competition is open to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Essays must be written in English and be the work of students who are enrolled in a third level institution in Ireland or abroad, or within one year expiration of that enrollment.

Essay/Submission Details: Essays must be no longer than 5,000 words (including all references). All entries must use an accepted referencing style (such as APA, Harvard, Oscola), be typed, double-spaced, and include an abstract of approximately 100 words. Entries should be submitted, in Word or PDF format, via email by the student or their lecturer/professor (including the student in the email submission). In the email, please include: name, institutional affiliation, degree programme (please specify if undergraduate or postgraduate), and enrollment particulars.

Judging: Entries will be judged by the essay competition committee, assessed according to level and judged on the criteria:
1) relevance of content to Irish legal history;
2) makes a contribution to the knowledge base;
3) clarity of organisation and argument;
4) use of the literature, and
5) writing style/quality.

Deadline: Essays should be received no later than 31st May 2022.

Results: Results will be announced no later than 31st July 2022.

Please email essay submissions to:
Dr Lynsey Black, Department of Law, Maynooth University – lynsey.black@mu.ie

Sir Anthony Hart Memorial Lecture 2021

 

To honour the life and legacy of the distinguished judge and legal historian (and a former President of the Society), Sir Anthony Hart, the Benchers of the Inn of Court in Northern Ireland have organised an annual memorial lecture.

The inaugural Sir Anthony Hart Memorial Lecture will take place on Thursday 11 November 2021 at 18.15 in the Inn of Court of Northern Ireland. The lecture will be given by Justice of the United Kingdom Supreme Court, The Right Honourable Lord Stephens of Creevyloughgare on ‘1798: a tale of two barristers’.

Lord Stephens was one of Sir Anthony’s pupils at the Bar.

 

Numbers are unfortunately restricted, but you are invited to watch online.
To register, and receive login details, please email Lisa Mayes at Lisa.Mayes@barofni.org

 

 

Submission deadline for abstracts extended to 27 September

LAW AND CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE

Queen’s University, Belfast
6-9 July 2022

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 25th British Legal History Conference 2022 In association with the Irish Legal History Society Queen’s University, Belfast 6-9 July 2022

The closing date for submission of abstracts has been extended until Monday 27 September

The Call For Papers and all other conference information can be found here.

Award of the ILHS 2021 Postdoctoral Bursary to Dr Lia Brazil

The Irish Legal History Society is pleased to announce that the Postdoctoral Bursary for 2021 has been awarded to Dr Lia Brazil of Nuffield College, Oxford.

Dr Brazil is a postdoctoral fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford, as part of the AHRC funded project ‘International NGOs in the Long Humanitarian Century’ (2021 – 2024). She completed her BA at Trinity College Dublin, her MA in European History at UCD, and her PhD in History at the European University Institute, Florence. Her PhD research looked at the history of international law in the British Empire, focusing on the South African War (1899 – 1902) and the Irish struggle for independence (1916 – 1923).

Her current research project looks at efforts made by the republican faction during the Irish civil war to appeal for international humanitarian intervention on behalf of interned prisoners. In particular it concentrates on delegations of Irish women, who travelled to Geneva to petition on behalf of these prisoners under international humanitarian law. She will use the research grant to explore the legal appeals they made to the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.

The passing of John L. Leckey

 

John L Leckey

 

The Society deeply regrets to note the death of John L Leckey on 5 August 2021. He served as Joint Honorary Treasurer of the Society, based in Belfast, from 1993 to 2000.

 

John was admitted to the Roll of Solicitors in Northern Ireland in 1974 and was appointed HM Coroner for Greater Belfast in 1993. He subsequently served as Senior Coroner for Northern Ireland until his retirement in 2015. He presided over a number of a number of difficult inquests, always with his innate courtesy.

 

John was an author together with Professor Desmond Greer QC (hon.), of Coroners’ Law and Practice in Northern Ireland which deals with the law and practice relating to coroners in Northern Ireland with appropriate reference to developments in Ireland.

 

The Society extends its condolences to John’s wife Janet and their sons Simon and Peter.

 

His obituary in The Irish Times can be read here.

 

 

The passing of Dr Andrew Lyall

The Society is saddened to learn of the passing of one of our members, Dr Andrew Lyall, on 11 February 2011, aged 78.

Andrew held a PhD and LLD from the University of London and was a barrister of Gray’s Inn.

Beginning his teaching career in Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, Andrew moved to Dublin in 1980. He taught Land Law at the UCD Law School for 27 years, before retiring in 2007 and moving to London where he continued to actively research and write legal history.

He published many books and articles, including a seminal textbook on Land Law in Ireland (Roundhall); Irish Exchequer Reports (Selden Society); The Acts of James II’s Irish Parliament of 1689 (Irish Manuscripts Commission, with John Bergin); The Irish House of Lords: A Court of Law in the Eighteenth Century (Clarus Press). One of his most recent publications was Granville Sharp’s Cases on Slavery (Hart Publishing). He was a frequent attendee at the ILHS and BLHC, and was well known by many in the legal history academic community.

Irish Constitutional Change, 1920-1922

 

A video of the event can be watched here

 

Spring Discourse (via webinar) 2021

During the period 1920-1922, the Government of Northern Ireland was established, ‘’Articles of agreement for a Treaty between Great Britain and Ireland’ were signed, and the constitution of the Irish Free State was adopted.

When the dust of the War of Independence had settled, the Irish constitutional landscape had changed dramatically. Under the Government of Ireland Act, 1920 a devolved administration with a Home Rule Parliament had been established in Belfast for six of the Ulster counties. The act had been a failure in the remaining 26 counties where, following partition, a solution was found in dominion status, so that the Irish Free State bore a relationship to the United Kingdom similar to that of Canada.

In this Webinar, John Larkin, Bláthna Ruane and Thomas Mohr will examine the legal steps during that period by which Northern ireland and the Irish Free State were established and the constitution arrangements which then emerged and what irish people thought of their new consitutional arrangements.

John Larkin QC is a practising barrister at the Bar of Northern Ireland and a former Attorney General for that jurisdiction. He will speak to the topic:-

One Irish Constitution, two Irish Parliaments: the Government of Ireland Act, 1920

Dr Bláthna Ruane SC is a Senior Counsel, who has written widely on the constitution, law and government. She is an Adjunct Professor of Law at the Sutherland School of Law at University College, Dublin and was a member of the Constitution Review Group 1995-6. She will speak to the topic:-

The ‘so-called Treaty’: the implications of legal form for achieving settlement

Dr Thomas Mohr is an associate professor in the Sutherland School of Law at UCD and the author of Guardian of the Treaty published by Four Courts Press in association with the Society in 2016. He will speak to the topic;-

What did Irish people think of the Free State Constitution in 1922.”

 

                                                        

© Parliamentary Archives