Research Fellowship in European Administrative History

JEV Research Fellowship for European Administrative History 2017

The research fellowship is donated by Professor Erk Volkmar Heyen who until his retirement had been holder of the chair of Public Law and European Administrative Law at the Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald. He was also the editor of the “Jahrbuch für europäische Verwaltungsgeschichte/Yearbook of European Administrative History” (JEV). His awarding is based on a selection procedure organized by the Max Planck Institute.

Applications for the year 2017 can be submitted until 30 September 2016.

For further information please s click here or email Dr. Peter Collin (collin@rg.mpg.de)

 

Doing Women’s Legal History

As we approach the centenary in 2019 of women’s admission to the legal profession in the UK and Ireland, lawyers and legal scholars have initiated several projects to mark this achievement which aim to uncover and recover the history of women’s experiences of law. These include the Women’s Legal Landmarks project, the First 100 Years project and the First Women Lawyers in Great Britain and the Empire Symposium series. This is a golden age for legal scholars undertaking historical work on women and law and for historians working on legal issues.

At the same time, many scholars involved in these and other projects face challenges of methodological insecurity, if not ignorance, because they are working outside their own discipline and sources. Women’s legal history, while well-developed in North America, is still in its infancy in the UK and Ireland.

A conference will take place at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studes in London on 26 October 2016.

The aim of this conference is to bring together scholars working in the field to share experiences of doing women’s legal history, to learn from each other, and to build and develop the discipline of feminist legal history (that is, women’s legal history from a feminist perspective) in the UK and Ireland.

Plenary speakers

There will be two plenary speakers at the conference:

  • June Purvis, feminist historian, editor of the Women’s History Review and convenor of the Women’s History Network, who will talk about researching the suffragette movement from a feminist perspective and how the suffragettes have so often been represented by traditional (usually male) historians as mad, irrational, and damaging to the cause of votes for women; and
  • Gillian Murphy from the Women’s Library at the LSE, who will discuss the holdings of the Women’s Library including both primary and secondary sources relevant to scholars working on women’s legal history.

Abstracts

If you are interested in presenting a paper at the conference, please submit a title and abstract of 250 words to the organiser, Rosemary Auchmuty, to whom enquiries on the academic content of the conference should also be addressed. Email:r.auchmuty@reading.ac.uk. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is 31 July 2016.

 

 

Enquiries

For general enquiries please contact: Belinda Crothers, Academic Programmes Manager Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR. Email: Belinda.Crothers@sas.ac.uk

For additional information please click here or  contact ials.events@sas.ac.uk.

Legal History in Toronto

The American Society for Legal History’s annual conference 2016 takes place in Toronto, Ontario from 27-30 October. Details about the conference and how to book are available here.

On 27 October, a one-day  workshop will be held at the downtown campus of Osgoode Hall Law School to increase awareness of digital legal history, and encourage discussion of how digital methods and technologies can be used to analyze and present the legal past, and of new initiatives to undertake such projects.

The workshop combines an extended showcase of four projects that each employs a different approach — O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law and FamilyThe Lawyers’ Code: Tracking the Migration and Influence of the Field CodeDigital Harlem; and Voices of Authority: the Old Bailey Courtroom — and a set of hands-on workshops offering a beginner-level introduction to the methods used in those projects. Further details are available on the workshop website.

 

New Publication on the Privy Council Appeal

We are delighted to announce the publication of Dr. Thomas Mohr’s Guardian of the TrGuardian of the Treatyeaty by Four Courts Press. Further details are available on our publications page.

All members of the Society will receive a complimentary copy, while non-members can purchase their copy here.

The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council was the final appellate court of the British Empire. Dr. Mohr examines the history of the Irish appeal to the Privy Council in the 1920s and 30s, and looks at the politics behind appeals.

In 1935 the Irish Free State became the first part of the Empire to abolish the right of appeal to the Privy Council.

Dr. Thomas Mohr is a Lecturer / Assistant Professor at the UCD Sutherland School of Law, where he teaches jurisprudence, evidence and the history of public law.

The front cover features a painting of the Privy Council chamber by Ptolemy Dean.

 

British Legal History Conference 2017

Call for Papers for the 23rd British Legal History Conference 2017: Networks and Connections

Wednesday 5 July 2017 – Saturday 8 July 2017

In tracing the way that legal ideas emerge and expand, historians have become increasingly interested in exploring the way that networks are developed and connections made. Legal history is full of connections – between people and places, jurisdictions and ideas. The way that the law develops may be influenced by particular social, professional or political groups, or by wider national, imperial or transnational networks. The law may change direction because of new connections made, whether in the form of the transplantation of legal concepts from one forum to another, or in the form of the influence of new ways of thinking or acting. These connections or networks may be simple or complex, transitory or enduring, ad hoc or accidental. The aim of this conference is to explore the wide range of networks and connections which influence the development of law and legal ideas over time, in a variety of different scholarly contexts. We welcome proposals from historians interested in exploring these themes in all fields of legal history, whether doctrinal or contextual, domestic or transnational.


About the Conference
The Conference will be held from the 5th to the 8th of July 2017. Registration will be on the 5th of July. Delegates will be able to find accommodation in the wide range of nearby hotels.

Call for Papers

Proposals concerning any epoch or part of the world are welcome and proposals from postgraduate and early career researchers are encouraged.

Proposals for papers (maximum 300 words) should be sent to blhc2017@ucl.ac.uk by 26 August 2016.

Conference Organisers
Dr Ian Williams, Faculty of Laws, UCL
Professor Michael Lobban, LSE Law

Further Information

See the conference website

Reviews of ‘The Irish Stage’

One of our recent publications has been attracting widespread positive reviews on both sides of the Irish Sea. W.N. Osborough’s The Irish Stage: a Legal History (Four Courts Press, 2015) has been favourably reviewed in the Dublin Review of Books  (November 2015) and the Times Literary Supplement (March 2016) [subscription required]

Philip Astley was awarded the second Dublin theatre patent in 1788. His circus extravaganza, left, as aficionados may be aware, comes in for attention in Jane Austen’s Emma and Charles Dickens’ The Old Curiosity Shop

The book has been described as ‘meticulously researched…highly original’ (TLS), and Professor Osborough described as ‘the doyen of Irish legal academics’ (DRB). Further details about the book are available on our Publications page.

Comparative Legal History

The latest issue of Comparative Legal History is a special edition on Lay Participation in Legal Comparative Legal HistorySystems:

Markus Dubber & Heikki Pihlajamäki: ‘Lay participation in modern law: a comparative historical analysis’

David Mirhady: ‘Knowing the law and deciding justice: lay expertise in the democratic Athenian courts’

Anthony Musson: ‘Lay participation: the paradox of the jury’

Niamh Howlin:  ‘The politics of jury trials in nineteenth-century Ireland’ (limited free access here)

Simon Stern: ‘Forensic oratory and the jury trial in nineteenth-century America’

Markus Dubber: ‘The schizophrenic jury and other palladia of liberty: a critical historical analysis’

 

 

The Irish Legal History Society on 1916

As part of the ongoing 1916 commemorations, three members of the Council of the Irish Legal History Society have contributed to the latest edition Irish Independent’s Special 1916 Supplement Series.

These supplements are aimed at a broad readership and will be made available in all secondary schools.

Dr Niamh Howlin: “The Trial of Roger Casement: A Legal Travesty?”

Mr. Felix M. Larkin: “Out of Step: Dublin Newspapers’ Response to the Rising”

Mr. Robert Marshall: “Charles Blackader: Old Black’s Military Court Fired Volleys”

A drawing of Roger Casement in the dock. Felix M. Larkin at the statue of Sir John Gray in O'Connell Street, Dublin. Gray owned the Freeman's Journal from 1841 until his death in 1875, and it remained in the hands of the Gray family until 1892. Brigadier-General Blackader at his headquarters Le Sart, France]. July 2015. Photographer: H. D. Girdwood. Credit: British Library Archibald Bodkin (later the Director of Public Prosecutions) and Travers Humphreys outside Bow Street.

Postdoctoral and Research Scholarships at Max Planck

The Max Planck Institute for European Legal History (MPIeR) will be awarding several scholarships for a research stay at the institute in 2017.

Postdoc Scholarships enable highly qualified researchers from abroad who already obtained a PhD to either develop a new research topic in a thematically relevant context or to pursue an already existing project. Established researchers from abroad who have received their PhD more than 10 years ago can apply for a Research Scholarship, which enables them to come to the institute as a guest in order to pursue their own research project at the MPIeR.

The deadline is March 2016 to start in 2017. They are for 3 or 6 months and are paid (€2100 p.m. for postdoc, 2300 p.m. for research).

click here for further details

 

Presidential Discourse 2015

On 27 November outgoing President of the Society, Mr Robert Marshall, delivered his presIMG_0445 - Copyidential discourse. His paper, entitled ‘Lisnafanna: A Townland in Turmoil on the Cavan Headford Estate 1870-1900’, was based on a  close study of the Headford estate papers. The paper provided some fascinating insights into the existence and operation of subversive or subaltern law on a Cavan estate in the late nineteenth century.  It looked specifically at the National League’s boycotting campaign and how this operated at a local and personal level. Interestingly, even on an estate where the Plan was in place, roughly two thirds of rent was still paid.

Mr Marshall went on to consider the legal procedures and processes which followed the fatal shooting of one of the boycotters. The coroner’s inquest saw the apportionment of some blame to the constabulary. Although a verdict of murder was returned by the coroner’s jury, the grand jury, by contrast, found ‘no true bill’, and the case did not proceed to trial.

All of this illustrates the role of the community in policing and sanctioning certain behaviours, and it the paper also explored the complex relationship between the ‘official’ law and the subaltern code.

A full text of the paper will be published in one of the Society’s upcoming collections of essays.